News

by Scott Barsotti

This article first appeared on HowlRound, a knowledge commons by and for the theatre community.

Most of us who make theatre have found ourselves, at one point or another, in a conversation about why we do what we do. No matter the reason for one’s passion for theatre, a sentiment that is common among theatre artists is that theatre is what they were born to do. Believe it or not, there’s now data to back this up....

When she took the Johnson O’Connor aptitude tests in 2012, Sara Gorsky was working as a project manager for a boutique web design firm. “I always had this generic technical knowledge, above [the average person], in terms of knowing my way around computers and knowing basic programming,” she said, “At that job I learned how to apply design to websites.” High in Analytical Reasoning and Number Series with an Objective personality, her aptitude pattern has all of the earmarks of an effective manager and computer whiz (“I taught myself Photoshop,” she adds), but she possesses many additional...

 by Richard Brehler

What people want from a career isn't necessarily just what the work is about. Understanding what you want in a larger sense—stability, status, helping people—helps you choose what you do as much as understanding your aptitudes does.  

Some time ago, the Foundation tested a high school student who intended to pursue a medical career. She'd always done well in her science and math courses, and her score on an interest profile indicated that the scientific and technological areas appealed to her the most. Her aptitude pattern, however, was one that...

Steve Greene, director of our New York office, was interviewed by Adam Taggart, President and co-founder of Peak Prosperity. Listen to it here.

Frequency of changing majors

Reports in the media note the difficulties of parents today who are trying to find the best value of higher education for their students. Increasing college costs have made it all the more important for students and parents to make cost effective decisions.

The ACT organization recently noted that whether a student graduates with their original declared major or changes majors is about a 50/50 chance.

Apparently more than half of the time college...

Rex E. Jung, Ph.D.

Are you more likely to come up with a creative idea if you produce many ideas? This question is at the core of the "equal-odds" rule, formulated by Dean Keith Simonton, who has observed that highly creative individuals tend to put out a lot of ideas. Pablo Picasso is, perhaps, best known for his masterpiece Guernica, which attempts to translate the horrors of war. However, over the course of his career, he produced over 25,000 individual pieces of art. Beethoven...

Sue Campbell talks about going through the aptitude testing for herself and for her two sons on the website Next Avenue. Read it here.

How to Figure Out if You and Your Career are Meant to Be appeared in Fast Company in October 2014. 

Some of our clients...

The Foundation is working with Dr. Rex Jung of the University of New Mexico to recruit twins for a major study of heritability, aptitude, and brain imaging. If you are a twin, or if you know twins (or other multiple births) who might be interested in participating, we'd love to hear from you. It is essential that both twins (or at least two of any other multiple) participate. Full details can be obtained from Dr. Jung and his associates at research@brainandbehavioral.com or 505-272-7036.

by Scott Barsotti

Blair Robertson was working full-time at Groupon in Chicago when she was tested by Johnson O’Connor. That was 2012, and her position for the discount giant was as a City Planner for the national sales team. It was a job that involved a lot of research, strategic thinking, communication, and coordination. The job used many of her skills and talents, but she wasn’t passionate about it. When I ask her if she was dissatisfied by that job, she responds, “I wasn’t dissatisfied, I liked it fine. It was a creative environment, but I was getting...

by Scott Barsotti

When he was alive and working with clients, there was a term Johnson O’Connor was notorious for throwing around. He can be heard using it on old recordings, and it frequently appears in his writings: “The Too Many Aptitude Person.” He even wrote a book called The Too Many Aptitude Woman just to immortalize the idea. The sentiment was one of sympathy more than anything; believing that the use of one’s aptitudes was critical to job satisfaction, O’Connor would chuckle ruefully—as a grandfather might—at those individuals who had more...

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